Maps for car navigation

I had an opportunity to watch Garmin nĂ¼vi GPS equipped with CN maps while travelling by a car some time ago. I was curious about how good those maps are compared to OpenStreetMap. By my observation the Garmin maps are worse. They tried to navigate us through fields (despite unpaved ways were disabled in setup) or through a dead end street. Sure, OpenStreetMap contains errors too, but it has been making great progress at least in our country. While I wasn’t much certain about using OpenStreetMap for car navigation a year ago, I’ve completely relied on it this year on my occasional trips, even when going abroad. And of course I fix errors and apply changes I discover. I’m not going to use proprietary maps for navigation anymore, despite their prominent support by proprietary GPS devices. OpenStreetMap is a nice free product and it’s worth to contribute to it.

Well, we’ve got a nice free map. Now I’d like to have an outdoor navigation with a documented interface so that OpenStreetMap can be used on it without problems. What do you think, Garmin?

Stockfish

Do you know which PC chess playing engine became the second strongest one in the world after Rybka this year? It’s Stockfish, a free chess engine distributed under the GNU General Public License.

It may look surprising that a hobby program with publicly available source code can beat all the proprietary engines with their secrets and hard working full-time developers. But it just proves that cooperation, open development, sharing (Stockfish developers make just the playing engine and don’t have to care about user interfaces already provided by other programs) and making things for fun may lead to excellent results.

Moving to Org-mode and Chronicle

I’ve started using Org-mode some time ago (more on this sometimes later). Consolidation of my personal information management and complete move to Org-mode applies also to my weblog articles. They are now part of my Org and all I additionally needed was to publish the resulting HTML texts.

I looked for something simple and available in Debian and decided to use Chronicle. The only real problem was that Chronicle doesn’t retain file names and makes new file names based on the article titles. I didn’t like this – if nothing else it breaks contingent links to my weblog site. But Chronicle is free software and it wasn’t hard to change it to my needs.

I hope that you, dear readers, won’t have any problems with my weblog after this change.