Installing an alternative ROM on Google Nexus 10

Enough is enough. I don’t like how the stock Android installation treats its users and I finally decided to replace it on my Google Nexus 10 with something else. The reasonable choices were CyanogenMod, AOKP and OmniROM. I decided to install AOKP.

Installation instructions looked like installing an alternative ROM on Nexus is a completely easy (and safe) process. It wasn’t that easy though, there is some missing and misleading information in those installation instructions. Due to it, I got a bit scared about three times during the process and had to search the Web for solutions. Thanks to all those kind people who post instructions, answers and solutions I was able to complete the installation successfully. So here is another short guide summarizing how to install an alternative ROM on current (4.4) stock Nexus 10, based on my own experience:

  • Accept that by following these or other similar instructions you can brick your device, lose warranty, etc.
  • Backup everything on your tablet you want to retain. All data may get deleted during the installation.
  • Install Android SDK on your PC. You need it to get working adb and fastboot.
  • On your PC, download TWRP recovery image for your device. You can use ClockworkMod as well, I chose TWRP so that I could contingently install OmniROM without replacing the recovery again.
  • Download the desired ROM and Google applications (if you want them) and put them to /sdcard/ directory on your tablet.
  • Enable developer’s setting on the tablet: Go to settings, device information and tap several times on the build number, until you see the message about being a developer.
  • Go back in settings, enter the developer’s settings and enable USB debugging.
  • Connect the tablet to your PC via a USB cable. The tablet should indicate that you’re in USB developer’s mode.
  • Check that sudo adb devices (use adb binary from Android SDK) shows your tablet on your PC. Note it’s important to run adb as root for the first time. It starts a server process on the first invocation and if that starts under an ordinary user, adb functions may not work even under root later.
  • If there is something strange in adb devices output, such as no entry at all, question marks or a message about permissions, then there is something wrong with your setup.
  • Run adb reboot bootloader. The tablet reboots and enters bootloader menu.
  • Run sudo fastboot oem unlock (use fastboot binary from Android SDK). The tablet should reboot, with unlocked lock displayed under “Google”.
  • Perhaps the tablet gets stuck on the boot. It looks scary, but it can (hopefully) be fixed following the next instructions. If the tablet boots normally, skip a few next instructions and continue with “re-enable USB debugging”.
  • Long press Power + Volume Up + Volume Down to restart the tablet and to enter the boot menu.
  • Select “recovery mode” using the volume buttons and press Power. An Android robot with a triangle appears after a short while.
  • Shortly tap Power + Volume Up (the volume key on the right). A menu appears.
  • Select “wipe data” and wait until it finishes.
  • Select “reboot” and the tablet should reboot fine now. Your data is lost (no problem as that will happen during the installation anyway) and the tablet must be set up as when it was started for the first time after you had bought it.
  • Re-enable USB debugging in developer’s settings.
  • Run adb reboot bootloader to enter the bootloader.
  • Run sudo fastboot flash recovery RECOVERY-IMAGE.zip (if you decided to use TWRP then RECOVERY-IMAGE should be something like openrecovery-twrp-*-manta.img).
  • Select “power off” on the tablet.
  • Long press Power + Volume Up + Volume Down to power the tablet on and to enter the boot menu. Don’t start the tablet normally otherwise the installed recovery may get replaced with the original one during the boot.
  • Select “recovery mode” and you should be in TWRP now.
  • Perform “Backup” in TWRP to backup the original system.
  • Perform “Wipe” in TWRP.
  • If your installation .zip files are not in /sdcard, you can upload them now using adb push YOUR-DOWNLOADED-ROM-FILE.zip /sdcard/ from PC.
  • Perform “Install” in TWRP for your ROM (and Google applications, if you want them) zip files.
  • Perform “Reboot” in TWRP.
  • Hopefully the new system starts now and you are freed from the Google restrictions.

Many thanks to all those who develop alternative Android installations with improved user freedom!

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